Patient Education

a) Teeth For Life:


Practicing good oral hygiene means maintaining your smile by visiting the dentist regularly and taking care of your teeth and gums between checkups. Our practice wants to make sure that you get the most out of your office visits, and that your teeth stay healthy for life! We'll work with you to provide complete dental care, and show you how to maintain your smile at home with the right dental products for you and your family.

Dental Cleanings and Regular Checkups

Regular dental checkups are an important part of maintaining your oral health. During your regular checkup, your hygienist will:
  • Check for any problems that you may not see or feel
  • Look for cavities or any other signs of tooth decay
  • Inspect your teeth and gums for gingivitis and signs of periodontal disease
  • Provide a thorough teeth cleaning, rinse, and polish
Visiting the dentist every six months gives you the chance to talk with your doctor and receive answers for any questions you may have about your oral health. Checkups are also a great way for you to find out about new treatments that may benefit your smile.

Choosing the Right Toothpaste and Toothbrush

From toothpaste and mouthwash to toothbrushes and dental floss, it's important to choose the right products for your smile. Keep in mind that when you're looking for a new toothpaste or toothbrush be sure to choose one that has been approved by the Indian Dental Association (IDA). Your dentist can also help by recommending certain dental products for use at home.

Learn More

Did you know that at birth, people already have 20 primary (baby) teeth that begin erupting after six months, and that by age 21 there are no more primary teeth, and all 32 permanent teeth have erupted?

b) Preventive Care


Preventive dental care is important throughout your life, no matter your age. By practicing good oral hygiene at home and scheduling regular checkups with your dentist, you can help keep your smile bright and healthy for many years to come. Here are a few simple ways that you can prevent the build-up of plaque and cavities:
  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush. Use fluoride toothpaste to remove food particles and plaque from the tooth surfaces. Also be sure to brush the top surface of your tongue; this will remove any extra plaque causing food particles, and help keep your breath fresh!
  • Clean between your teeth by flossing at least once a day. You can also use a mouthwash to help kill bacteria and freshen your breath. Decay-causing bacteria can linger between teeth where toothbrush bristles can't reach. Floss and mouthwash will help remove plaque and food particles from between the teeth and under the gum line.
  • Eat a balanced diet, and try to avoid extra-sugary treats. Nutritious foods such as raw vegetables, plain yogurt, cheese or fruit can help keep your smile healthy.
  • Remember to schedule regular checkups with your dentist every six months for a professional teeth cleaning.
  • Ask your dentist about dental sealants, a protective plastic coating that can be applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay often starts.
  • If you play sports, be sure to ask your dentist about special mouthguards designed to protect your smile.
  • If it's been six months since your last dental checkup, then it's time to contact our practice and schedule your next appointment!

    c) Dental Exams & Cleaning


    Preventing Problems Before They Start

    The health of your teeth and mouth is very important to the well-being of your entire body, and while routine brushing and flossing at home is necessary to keep your smile looking its best, visiting your dentist for a comprehensive exam and cleaning is essential. The Indian Dental Association recommends that you visit your dentist every six months to ensure your teeth stay healthy and your smile stays beautiful.
    By routinely seeing your dentist for exams and cleanings, you can:
    • Prevent tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath
    • Save money by avoiding costly and extensive dental procedures
    • Keep your teeth white by reducing staining from food and drinks
    • Shorten the time spent in your dentist's office
    • Have a smile that will last a lifetime

    The Exam


    During your exam, your dentist will thoroughly examine your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay, gum disease and other health problems. Your dentist may also want to take X-rays to see what is happening beneath the surface of your teeth and gums. Whether these X-rays are traditional or digital, the images provided will help your dentist discover dental issues not visible to the naked eye.

    Professional Cleanings

    Your dentist will begin your cleaning by exploring the surface of your teeth to determine if you have any cavities and to examine the quality of existing fillings. Dentist will then perform a periodontal exam to make sure your gums adhere tightly to your teeth, and no periodontal disease or bone loss may be occurring.
    Next, your dentist will carefully clean your teeth with a variety of tools to remove any hard mineral buildup (tartar) from your teeth. Then your dentist will floss your teeth, use a polishing compound and apply fluoride. Cleanings usually aren't painful, but if you have any anxiety about your dental exam, be sure to let your dentist know. They may offer several sedation options to ensure your comfort. If your dentist finds tooth decay or gum disease, they will talk to you about changing your brushing or flossing habits. In severe cases, they may recommend antibiotics or other dental treatments. If your teeth and gums appear to be healthy, your dentist will probably recommend that you continue your brushing and flossing routine as usual.

    d) Gum Care


    Bleeding Gums Can Kill More Than Your Smile

    Would you be concerned if your hands bleed every time you wash them? Your gums are no different.
    Bleeding that occurs when you floss, brush, or eat is usually caused by a bacterial infection and represents one of the first symptoms of gum disease (Periodontal Disease). Researchers are finding links between periodontal infection and other diseases of the human body. Heart Disease, Diabetes, Respiratory Disease, Osteoporosis, Artificial Joints, and Pregnancy complications seem to be connected to your oral health. The current theory is that bacteria present in infected gums breaks loose, travels though your bloodstream, and attaches itself to your heart or other body parts. A resent study found that 85% of heart-attack patients have periodontal disease, making this connection higher than the relationship between high cholesterol and heart attacks.

    What Should You Do?

    Keep your mouth healthy! It is not “just a cleaning” anymore. See your dentist or hygienist at least twice a year for periodic maintenance and screening. Periodontal disease is often painless until it reaches more advanced stages, however there is a simple test that your dental team can use to uncover this problem even in its beginning stages. Like most diseases of the body early detection is essential. Also, remember to brush and floss. You will need to be an active participant in prevention. Gum disease is a serious infection that should always be taken seriously.